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Re: InstantDB: Re: Version 3.13 & Network Support using RmiJDBC


BSmith@ixl.com wrote:
> 
> Below is the policy file that I have that I use to ammend the java.policy in
> the jre. I launch the rmi server with the following:
> 
> java -Ddb.root=c:\\src\\project\\db -Djava.security.policy=db.policy
> RmiJdbc.RJJdbcServer org.enhydra.instantdb.jdbc.idbDriver
> 
> Where I am having problems is the last PropertyPermission line. If I remove
> it or mark it as read only I get a security exception. There has to be other
> properties being read. Maybe they are being read by RmiJdbc.
>

I attach my own java.policy & java.security files to this mail: I used
them on Windows NT 4 with a JDK 1.2, and it worked fine.

I don't know why these work, and others don't: I didn't change anything
to these files!
It seems that different deliveries contain different files...

> BTW, the link at the instantdb site for RmiJdbc is out of date. The new one
> is http://www.objectweb.org/RmiJdbc/RmiJdbcHomePage.htm
> 

Right, RmiJdbc is now hosted by objectweb.org.

Regards,
 Pierre-Yves Gibello :)

// Standard extensions get all permissions by default

grant codeBase "file:${java.home}/lib/ext/-" {
	permission java.security.AllPermission;
};

// default permissions granted to all domains

grant { 
	// Allows any thread to stop itself using the java.lang.Thread.stop()
	// method that takes no argument.
	// Note that this permission is granted by default only to remain
	// backwards compatible.
	// It is strongly recommended that you either remove this permission
	// from this policy file or further restrict it to code sources
	// that you specify, because Thread.stop() is potentially unsafe.
	// See "http://java.sun.com/notes"; for more information.
	permission java.lang.RuntimePermission "stopThread";

	// allows anyone to listen on un-privileged ports
	permission java.net.SocketPermission "localhost:1024-", "listen";

	// "standard" properies that can be read by anyone

	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.version", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.vendor", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.vendor.url", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.class.version", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "os.name", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "os.version", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "os.arch", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "file.separator", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "path.separator", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "line.separator", "read";

	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.specification.version", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.specification.vendor", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.specification.name", "read";

	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.vm.specification.version", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.vm.specification.vendor", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.vm.specification.name", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.vm.version", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.vm.vendor", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.vm.name", "read";
	permission java.util.PropertyPermission "java.rmi.server.hostname", "read";
};

#
# This is the "master security properties file".
#
# In this file, various security properties are set for use by
# java.security classes. This is where users can statically register 
# Cryptography Package Providers ("providers" for short). The term 
# "provider" refers to a package or set of packages that supply a 
# concrete implementation of a subset of the cryptography aspects of 
# the Java Security API. A provider may, for example, implement one or 
# more digital signature algorithms or message digest algorithms.
#
# Each provider must implement a subclass of the Provider class.
# To register a provider in this master security properties file, 
# specify the Provider subclass name and priority in the format
#
#    security.provider.<n>=<className> 
#
# This declares a provider, and specifies its preference 
# order n. The preference order is the order in which providers are 
# searched for requested algorithms (when no specific provider is 
# requested). The order is 1-based; 1 is the most preferred, followed 
# by 2, and so on.
#
# <className> must specify the subclass of the Provider class whose 
# constructor sets the values of various properties that are required
# for the Java Security API to look up the algorithms or other 
# facilities implemented by the provider.
# 
# There must be at least one provider specification in java.security. 
# There is a default provider that comes standard with the JDK. It
# is called the "SUN" provider, and its Provider subclass
# named Sun appears in the sun.security.provider package. Thus, the
# "SUN" provider is registered via the following:
#
#    security.provider.1=sun.security.provider.Sun 
#
# (The number 1 is used for the default provider.) 
#
# Note: Statically registered Provider subclasses are instantiated 
# when the system is initialized. Providers can be dynamically 
# registered instead by calls to either the addProvider or 
# insertProviderAt method in the Security class.

#
# List of providers and their preference orders (see above):
#
security.provider.1=sun.security.provider.Sun

#
# Class to instantiate as the system Policy. This is the name of the class
# that will be used as the Policy object.
#
policy.provider=sun.security.provider.PolicyFile

# The default is to have a single system-wide policy file, 
# and a policy file in the user's home directory.
policy.url.1=file:${java.home}/lib/security/java.policy
policy.url.2=file:${user.home}/.java.policy

# whether or not we expand properties in the policy file
# if this is set to false, properties (${...}) will not be expanded in policy
# files.
policy.expandProperties=true

# whether or not we allow an extra policy to be passed on the command line
# with -Djava.security.policy=somefile. Comment out this line to disable
# this feature.
policy.allowSystemProperty=true

# whether or not we look into the IdentityScope for trusted Identities
# when encountering a 1.1 signed JAR file. If the identity is found
# and is trusted, we grant it AllPermission.
policy.ignoreIdentityScope=false

#
# Default keystore type.
#
keystore.type=jks

#
# Class to instantiate as the system scope:
#
system.scope=sun.security.provider.IdentityDatabase

#
# List of comma-separated packages that start with or equal this string
# will cause a security exception to be thrown when
# passed to checkPackageAccess unless the
# corresponding RuntimePermission ("accessClassInPackage."+package) has
# been granted.
package.access=sun.

#
# List of comma-separated packages that start with or equal this string
# will cause a security exception to be thrown when
# passed to checkPackageDefinition unless the
# corresponding RuntimePermission ("defineClassInPackage."+package) has
# been granted.
# 
# by default, no packages are restricted for definition, and none of
# the class loaders supplied with the JDK call checkPackageDefinition.
#
#package.definition=